4 Tools to Organize Social Media Content

Organization is something I believe is very personal. Each and every person has an organization structure that makes sense and works for them. At the same time, I think that we can all learn ways to improve what is working for us, and in order for that to happen, people have to share what they’re doing! So this week I’m going to share how I organize my social media content, and other communications I’m responsible for. I hope you’ll share what works for you, too!

Argyle Social

argyle

I don’t know how many times I’ve talked about Argyle Social, but it’s a lot. I really love the content calendar/scheduling platform, and it makes everything about keeping track of content easier for me. I have to make it work for me a bit, since Argyle currently doesn’t support posting to LinkedIn Company Pages, Tumblr, Instagram or using the targeting features of Facebook, but just being able to save draft posts for those things helps me schedule out the day. I use Argyle to show me my micro-view of social media content.

Google Calendar

google-calendar

While I use my Exchange calendar that is included with my work email address for my personal schedule, I use a Google Calendar to mark different communications or marketing plans that I have committed content to. I know that sounds kind of weird, but as our office is responsible for the entire university’s communications, I work with four PR people who have beats of each college and area on campus. They write communications plans for a variety of events and topics, and I add what social media I think is appropriate to that plan. After that, I have to follow through, so I add those social media pieces to the Google Calendar. It also includes things like when other advertisements and marketing pieces are running, so I can make sure to talk about them on social media. You can see I add a ton of things to it! I use Google Calendar to show more of a macro-view of my social media content.

Basecamp

basecamp

I mentioned our PR people, but our office also has an editor, a video team, a photographer and graphic designers. All of these people are necessary to make our news site run. As a group, they use Basecamp to keep track of stories, videos, news releases, advisories and pitches. I use their calendar to let me know when stories I want to feature on social media are coming out. I typically transfer this content straight into Argyle Social as a draft, to become a placeholder for when the news story is released.

Todoist

todoist

While this isn’t specifically a tool I use for social media, it definitely keeps me organized with everything in my life. Typically I use Todoist to keep track of social media-related things, reminding myself to update cover images, telling my social media interns something, or telling myself to add that piece of content I thought about while at the grocery store. Also, while my main role is social media, I am also responsible for a lot of different types of communications and marketing. Without Todoist, it would be a lot harder to get every thing done! Todoist is the most easy-to-use to do list I’ve come across, and I love that it’s fully featured, but you can use what works for you. I hate it when I’m forced into something that doesn’t work for me, but Todoist doesn’t do that! I also really love the mobile app, and the reminders I get through being a premium member ($3/month). It helps me prioritize everything going on, from my school work for my master’s, things I need to do around the house, and all of my work tasks. You just can’t beat it!

So what do you use to organize your social media content? Anything else others should consider, or do you use one of these tools is a different way?

Social Media Measurement: Taking the First Baby Steps

If you listen to what’s being said out there about measuring social media, you’re bound to hear everything from, “You must measure,” to, “It’s impossible to measure.” Personally, I find myself in between these two methodologies, thinking, “Measuring is important, but doesn’t replace intuition and gut feelings.” So where do you start measuring your social media? Here are a few key metrics to pay attention to, and some great tools for measuring your success.

Meaningful Measurements

facebook insights
Facebook Insights Graph

Facebook

If you’ve ever taken a look at the Facebook Insights for your brand page, you know there are quite a few numbers available, especially if you export the data. But there is a way to get a quick sense of how your Facebook posts are doing, by looking at the number of engaged users. This is a key metric that I look at, and have in my goals. I also like to take a look at the virality of those posts. This is the percentage of people who have created what Facebook calls stories out of the number of people who saw the post. This is a good way to see how posts have spread.

twitter

Twitter

Twitter doesn’t have any built-in analytics, but there are other opportunities to look at how your content is fairing out in the world. Retweets and favorites seem like an obvious way to measure, but this, again, measures engagement, which is a key metric in social media. Recording these numbers, along with replies, is a great way to start to get a grasp on measuring.

Tools to Measure

hootsuite ow.ly click summary
Hootsuite Ow.ly Click Summary

HootSuite

HootSuite has some great stats, even in the free version. HootSuite uses the Ow.ly link shortener, which opens up some possibilities of measuring what happens with your tweeted content. The Ow.ly Click Summary will break down clicks by region, rank the most popular tweets, and the top referrers.

 

 

 

Social Google Analytics
Google Analytics – Measuring Social Referrals

Google Analytics

I know what you’re saying, Google Analytics measures web traffic not social traffic! And this is partially true. But Google Analytics also includes a social section in which you can measure social clicks to your website. I use this feature all the time, since part of my social strategy is pushing traffic to our university’s news site. I can see exactly how much traffic came from social sources. Now, this doesn’t mean that the university’s social presences can claim all that traffic, but it’s still informative, especially if you combine it with one of the other measuring tools I’ve discussed.

Argyle Social Measurement
Argyle Social Measurement

Argyle Social

I’ve fallen in social media love, or at least that’s what I told my boss the minute after I finished watching a demo of Argyle Social. For someone who wants the highest level of organization possible when it comes to social media (which can be hard), this is the tool to make it happen. But that’s for a different blog post. One of the best parts about Argyle Social is the analytics it has built in. You can organize your content into campaigns, and also set goals for conversions. I especially love being able to see all of my stats in one place. Argyle Social is a paid solution, but I found it to be reasonably priced for my needs.

Have you started measuring your social media efforts? What are you using to measure?