Retweet After Me: Week of Oct. 14

This Week in Social: Expiration Dates for Social Media by Olsy Sorokina

Does the saying “The Internet never forgets” still hold up? This reverse amnesia of the Information Age has sparked many global discussions on privacy and online reputation, and it is reflected more and more in the changes made by those in charge of our online information, like social networks and ISPs. [Read More]

The Best (And Worst) Times to Post on Social Media (Infographic) by Rachel Gillett

We get it, managing your business’s social media accounts can be daunting: from tweaking tweet lengths to mastering Facebook tone, to using the right hashtags at the right times. But what savvy social media users know is that there’s a science to getting it right–if you follow certain parameters, you’re almost guaranteed to get the results you were working toward. All it takes is some knowledge and forethought, and anyone can be well on their way to posting engaging content. [Read More]

Provocative Ad Campaign On Pause by Kaitlin Mulhere

A Boston-area university has pressed pause on an ad campaign launched this summer that was described as bold and provocative. Suffolk University made noise in July when it began a campaign that described the small, private university as anti-elite and a haven for hard-working students. It was the university’s first broad campaign in eight years. [Read More]

Pinterest to Offer Targeted Pins, Tracking for Advertisers by Kevin Allen

Pinterest is stepping a bit closer to helping its retail advertisers understand their actual ROI. Publications have inferred the social media platform’s revamped advertising plan through some of its updated privacy policy documents; chief among these updates will be the ability for advertisers to directly target those Pinterest users who are already customers. [Read More]

Could Ello be the next Facebook rival? by Kevin Allen

Tired of being shown all those spammy ads on Facebook when you’re trying to figure out what your friends’ kids are up to? Do you wish there were a social platform that didn’t treat you like a piece of metadata? You’re not alone. Ello has been getting considerable attention recently, and we can almost guarantee your parents won’t use it. The service is opening to new members by invitation only. Invites for the service have been sold on eBay for up to $500, according to several reports. [Read More]

Retweet After Me: Week of Mar. 25, 2014

Department-Level Content Strategy by Erin Martin

Last year, I scraped up enough funding to attend Confab Higher Ed, the inaugural higher education content strategy conference held in Atlanta. As I was wandering around, meeting inspiring folks and talking shop with people who get it — who see the value in thoughtful, mindful online communication — I kept getting asked a question over and over. “You work for a department — like, directly with faculty?” Imagine an excited, incredulous face. [Read More]

Could Snapchat be the Next Big Trend in Student Marketing? by Patrick Quinn

Social media marketing has become a necessary resource in the realm of student recruitment but that doesn’t mean it isn’t a constant challenge to stay on top of the latest trends. It sometimes seems like a giant game of tag, chasing students and prospects to the next hot platform for a chance to communicate with them. We wrote recently about widely reported findings that teens are flocking away from Facebook, citing privacy concerns and the “uncoolness” of parents liking their posts. One emerging social media contender that has won significant enthusiasm among the 13-25 demographic is photo messaging app, Snapchat, currently top of the free Apple App chart. [Read More]

Facebook Reportedly Slashing Organic Reach for Pages by Melissa Hoffmann

Facebook is reportedly slashing organic reach for Pages, a move that could have a sweeping impact on brands that have spent big on the social platform as well as local companies that have worked hard with limited resources to develop often modest fan bases. [Read More]

Innovative Approaches to Student Admissions by Patrick Quinn

In the world of higher education, the beginning of March means that application deadlines for next fall’s admissions are fast approaching, if they haven’t already passed. Admission decisions actually began being released before Christmas for rolling, early and priority applications at some American colleges that believe the first acceptance letter a student receives is most likely to be acted upon. As the percentage of students sending out three or more applications has been steadily rising every year, some schools are taking innovative approaches to increasing the likelihood that their offers are accepted, thereby optimizing the admissions yield. [Read More]

The Secret To Airbnb’s Freakishly Rapid Orgy Response: “Scenario Planning” by Ian Allen

Airbnb uses strategic thinking to shield the company–and its renters–against scandals such as orgies, prostitution, and even suicides. Airbnb host Ari Teman handed over the keys to his Manhattan apartment last Friday to a guest visiting New York ostensibly for a wedding. But when Teman returned to his apartment that evening, he was aghast to learn that the guest had rented his apartment so he could host an all-night orgy that was open to the public. [Read More]

Retweet After Me: Week of Mar. 4, 2014

What If Twitter Got a Lot More Useful? by Simon Dumenco

The U.K. division of Twitter is trying to draw attention to the platform’s potential as a customer-service provider with a blog post this morning announcing just such an effort from the telecom giant O2. For Twitter, making noise about O2’s #TweetServe is a way to signal that it is serious about broadening its mass appeal. Twitter needs to demonstrate that it has utility beyond serving as, well, a news feed, a source of celebrity musings and a place to talk about TV. That whole social TV phenomenon, for one thing, isn’t necessarily as white-hot as it used to be, as my colleague Cotton Delo recently reported. [Read More]

Questions about badges in higher ed by Sheryl Grant

Amy McQuigge’s prompt How can colleges and universities use badges? is a lot more slope of enlightenment and a little less peak of inflated expectations when it comes to badges in higher ed (Looking at you, major media sources.) The disruptive potential of badges in higher ed makes for compelling headlines, but the real nuts-and-bolts innovation is happening at ground level. I thought I would contribute something to Amy’s question by taking a look at the variety of badge systems being designed for colleges and universities. I started with HASTAC’s higher ed tag in the Badges for Lifelong Learning topic on Scoop.it, but please add others I may have missed in the comments section below. [Read More]

Reconsidering the Social Media Hub by Georgy Cohen

One of my favorite projects when working at Tufts University was leading the creation of our social media hub, a custom-built page which hosted feeds from all of our social media accounts and served as an at-a-glance destination for campus social chatter. I was (and still am) extremely proud of what we built. [Read More]

Top 7 things successful brands do on Twitter by Katerina Petropoulou

Twitter is a powerful tool of engagement and brands are well aware of that, as more and more are now using the network for customer support and marketing. There’ve even been brands that did not hesitate to “fight” over a customer on Twitter! So there’s definitely a lot to learn from brands’ best Twitter practices. Let’s take a look at 7 things successful brands do on Twitter and you can do too, starting today. [Read More]

Beyond tweeting: Demystifying the social media editor by Ricardo Bilton

While the popular perception of the social media editor is a fresh-out-of-college intern sitting on Twitter all day, the now-ubiquitous role is more complicated than that — and more important. “Twitter and Facebook have become far more powerful tools for getting traffic, so the shift has become more focused on how to take advantage of social media to improve the site’s traffic and readership,” said Jeremy Stahl, Slate’s social media editor since 2010. [Read More]

Retweet After Me: Week of March 20, 2012

Here are this week’s Retweet-worthy links written in the airport during one of my many delays yesterday! Enjoy!

What Higher Ed Can Learn from Encyclopaedia Britannica by Joshua Kim

Encyclopaedia Britannica announced today that it will cease publication of the 32-volume print edition. Going forward, the focus will be on Britannica’s digital properties. I worked for Britannica.com, the Encyclopaedia Britannica spinoff, from 1998 to 2001. This job gave me a close-up seat to witness the promise of the first dot-com gold rush (1999 and 2000), and the just as rapid crash when the bubble deflated (2001). I think that the story of Britannica, including this latest chapter to cease print publication, has some things to teach us in higher ed. [ Read More ]

What a New Pinterest Study Means for Brands by Matt Wilson

Pinterest has a reputation for being a place where arts and crafts, home décor, fashion and food dominate the landscape. Now, the numbers prove it. [ Read More ]

12 Top Community Managers Share Their Tips for Better Engagement by Lauren Drell

Engagement is one of the most talked about metrics for ROI. Some argue that the raw number of “Likes”, comments and retweets don’t mean anything. Instead, they point to a fans’ level of investment, loyalty and engagement to determine whether social media is “paying off.” A community manager — or social media manager or brand manager, etc. — is responsible for growing this community, providing interesting content and increasing engagement, which should ultimately lead to increased revenue. [ Read More ]

Higher Ed at SXSW Packs the House storified by Rob Evans

@lizgross144 and @debmaue pulled together a great wide-ranging discussion about the challenges and solutions for using social media as a college or university. [ Read More ]

The Timeline Checklist All Facebook Pages Must Have by Jasper Krog

Creating a successful Facebook page requires more than just a few clicks, especially with the new timeline design. Even before timeline, there were so many things to consider that we’d found it helpful to create a checklist for pages. [ Read More ]

Retweet After Me: Week of March 13, 2012

Welcome to my new weekly series, Retweet After Me! Once a week, I’ll post a few articles that I’ve read over the last week and think need to be passed on. So enjoy some reads, and Retweet After Me!

9 Social Media Hacks I Use Every Day by Jay Baer

Social media isn’t inexpensive, it’s just different expensive. To do it well requires a tremendous time commitment, and regardless of what your life and lifestyle entails, the time you spend on social comes with an opportunity cost price tag. Thus, one of the characteristics that sets adept practitioners of social media apart from less successful adherents is wise use of time. [ Read More ]

12 Dos and Don’ts for PR Interns by Lorra M. Brown

When the semester began in January, I was busy sending credit verification letters to internship sites for my students. It is timely to include a short list of tips for student interns. Here are some dos and don’ts for interns… [ Read More ]

Why Higher Ed Sucks At Content Strategy by Michael Fienen

Let’s face it, higher ed has problems. They have a lot of problems. Whether it’s bad coding, poor graphic design, or a lack of upkeep, someone is always talking about something that’s not working and getting plenty of sympathy from the rest of the web development community. Article after article, conference after conference we talk about all the different things we have trouble with and try to understand why it doesn’t work and what to do about it. One area that’s been getting more and more focus, in part thanks to folks like Meet Content, is content strategy (regardless of whether or not you think it’s a “Real Thing.” I’m looking at you, Karlyn). With the start of a new year, many of us are taking some time to revisit our policies and practices, and get ready for a better 2012. But there’s one big problem when it comes to content strategy for us… [ Read More ]

5 Reasons Measuring Social Media Isn’t Always a Good Idea by Matt Ridings

Social media measurement is a seemingly simple issue with a complex point. Or perhaps a “nuanced” point is more accurate. I obviously believe in data; it’s a big part of what I’ve done over my career. [ Read More ]

Managing Negative Feedback: Social Media Marketing Campaigns by Angelita Williams

Social media marketing is becoming a most popular and useful marketing option for business. It is also readily apparent that social media is here to stay, and that is will prove to be ever more effective for worldwide users/proponents around the world. [ Read More ]

Have an interesting article that I should take a look at? Leave me a comment!

Customer Service Applies to Social Media Too

As some of you might know, I am getting ready to tie the knot in May. Thanks to this, I have been dealing with many different companies and the services and products they provide. Over the last few weeks, I have found myself in a tough position due to some mistakes by the company who is providing my bridesmaid dresses. If you know me personally, or follow me on Twitter, you may know who this company is, but since the mistakes have since been corrected, I am not going to give them anymore hell by mentioning them here. However, this doesn’t mean that there aren’t some social media customer service lessons to be learned, especially for higher education!

I feel like some companies forget that social media is just another channel for customer service, and a very important one at that. There are a lots of followers with all eyes on the conversation. Here are some tips to help make the conversation go as smoothly as possible!

Listen

Something I learned back when I was a waitress is to always listen to the entire problem being told to you. Many times, you think that you know what the problem will be, when in reality, the problem is something completely different. Make sure you solve the problems being voiced to you over social media by reading the entire problem, and even reaching out for more information if necessary.

Sorry Goes a Long Way

Apologize for the situation, no matter how large or small. You would be surprised how far the simple words, “I’m sorry,” go. It shows you understand their problem, and you are invested in assisting them find a solution.

No One Cares About the Processes

In every organization, there are processes to handle problems, there has to be. However, your customers do not care what your processes are. All they want is for you to listen to their problem and to fix it. Your answer to their problem should never be, “The ‘blank’ department is responsible for that, not me.” Rather, find out what needs to be done, and help fix the problem. This also applies to blame, it’s easy to blame someone else for the problem, but again, your customers don’t care about who made the mistake. They care that you fix it, and it is your job to take responsibility for finding a solution as a representative of your organization.

Make it Your Mission

It’s easy to pass off a complaint to someone else, but a customer doesn’t want to go through the shuffle of being passed from office to office. Make it your mission to help this customer get a resolution. Pick up the phone and find a specific person to help the situation. Ensure they contact the customer, and that a solution is reached.

Facebook Timeline for Brands: What it Means for Higher Ed

As most people know, Facebook Timeline for Brands was released to page admins yesterday. If you’re like me, you’ve been planning and scheming based on the rumors of what Timeline could have possibly looked like. Picking out cover images, thinking about how the changes will effect your content strategy, how will you decide what to pin to the top of your timeline and what to highlight, in addition to keeping all the new terms straight in your head! But now it’s here!

So, how do all these upgrades change the game?

The Look

The first noticeable change is of course the general look of the page. You have more real estate! This is a definite win. With the cover images, you can prominently display the beauty of your campus, or create a graphic that plays directly into a campaign you are running. There are almost endless possibilities. The only limitation, is that your cover image can’t be a majority of text. Facebook doesn’t want you dipping into their advertising revenues. However, as someone who doesn’t have a social media advertising budget because of the type of funding that my office receives, this is a huge improvement.

I would argue that this is even better than having a landing page, although I know many will disagree. Only people who haven’t liked your page automatically see your landing page, but once you have a committed user, they see your wall upon visiting your page. The cover image is always the first thing any one will see, no matter what their like status is.

Messages

When I first saw the messages button on my page, I was ecstatic! Did Facebook read my mind and find one of my biggest wants for a brand page? No, in fact, they didn’t. Profile users can now message page admins, and they can respond back, however, pages can not initiate the conversation. The reasoning being that spam in user’s inboxes would be out of control. I agree with this reason, however, can’t just the good admins who understand spamming is bad have the ability to reach out?

I know, I kind of seem obsessed with this, but I have good reason. On the Texas Tech page, we do not allow profanity (as most admins don’t), and if we remove a comment because of a curse word or two, I message them and ask them to repost without the curse words. That sounds fantastic, and most of the time, it works out fine. But sometimes, people are very angry, and I don’t always want my full name and everything about myself attached to the message I am sending. That is where being able to send messages as the page would be a huge improvement. Alas, it has not been added, so I will continue on.

Highlighting and Pinning Posts

These might be the two things I am the most excited about! Who doesn’t want to give their content more staying power? I don’t know anyone who doesn’t. Some things you post are more evergreen, or are more important than others, that’s just fact. Now page admins have the ability to make those things that are more important than others look more important, and stick around longer. Can’t get much better than that! I think this is even more important when you factor in how often higher ed pages can post and get the engagement they are looking for. (By the way: If you haven’t checked out these two articles by Blue Fuego, How much is too much on Facebook? and 2011 State of Higher Ed Facebook Pages you’re missing out on some good research!)

Resources

Here are also some good resources on Timeline for Brands that might help you get up and running!