Tag Archives: higher education

Retweet After Me: Week of March 13, 2012

Welcome to my new weekly series, Retweet After Me! Once a week, I’ll post a few articles that I’ve read over the last week and think need to be passed on. So enjoy some reads, and Retweet After Me!

9 Social Media Hacks I Use Every Day by Jay Baer

Social media isn’t inexpensive, it’s just different expensive. To do it well requires a tremendous time commitment, and regardless of what your life and lifestyle entails, the time you spend on social comes with an opportunity cost price tag. Thus, one of the characteristics that sets adept practitioners of social media apart from less successful adherents is wise use of time. [ Read More ]

12 Dos and Don’ts for PR Interns by Lorra M. Brown

When the semester began in January, I was busy sending credit verification letters to internship sites for my students. It is timely to include a short list of tips for student interns. Here are some dos and don’ts for interns… [ Read More ]

Why Higher Ed Sucks At Content Strategy by Michael Fienen

Let’s face it, higher ed has problems. They have a lot of problems. Whether it’s bad coding, poor graphic design, or a lack of upkeep, someone is always talking about something that’s not working and getting plenty of sympathy from the rest of the web development community. Article after article, conference after conference we talk about all the different things we have trouble with and try to understand why it doesn’t work and what to do about it. One area that’s been getting more and more focus, in part thanks to folks like Meet Content, is content strategy (regardless of whether or not you think it’s a “Real Thing.” I’m looking at you, Karlyn). With the start of a new year, many of us are taking some time to revisit our policies and practices, and get ready for a better 2012. But there’s one big problem when it comes to content strategy for us… [ Read More ]

5 Reasons Measuring Social Media Isn’t Always a Good Idea by Matt Ridings

Social media measurement is a seemingly simple issue with a complex point. Or perhaps a “nuanced” point is more accurate. I obviously believe in data; it’s a big part of what I’ve done over my career. [ Read More ]

Managing Negative Feedback: Social Media Marketing Campaigns by Angelita Williams

Social media marketing is becoming a most popular and useful marketing option for business. It is also readily apparent that social media is here to stay, and that is will prove to be ever more effective for worldwide users/proponents around the world. [ Read More ]

Have an interesting article that I should take a look at? Leave me a comment!

Customer Service Applies to Social Media Too

As some of you might know, I am getting ready to tie the knot in May. Thanks to this, I have been dealing with many different companies and the services and products they provide. Over the last few weeks, I have found myself in a tough position due to some mistakes by the company who is providing my bridesmaid dresses. If you know me personally, or follow me on Twitter, you may know who this company is, but since the mistakes have since been corrected, I am not going to give them anymore hell by mentioning them here. However, this doesn’t mean that there aren’t some social media customer service lessons to be learned, especially for higher education!

I feel like some companies forget that social media is just another channel for customer service, and a very important one at that. There are a lots of followers with all eyes on the conversation. Here are some tips to help make the conversation go as smoothly as possible!

Listen

Something I learned back when I was a waitress is to always listen to the entire problem being told to you. Many times, you think that you know what the problem will be, when in reality, the problem is something completely different. Make sure you solve the problems being voiced to you over social media by reading the entire problem, and even reaching out for more information if necessary.

Sorry Goes a Long Way

Apologize for the situation, no matter how large or small. You would be surprised how far the simple words, “I’m sorry,” go. It shows you understand their problem, and you are invested in assisting them find a solution.

No One Cares About the Processes

In every organization, there are processes to handle problems, there has to be. However, your customers do not care what your processes are. All they want is for you to listen to their problem and to fix it. Your answer to their problem should never be, “The ‘blank’ department is responsible for that, not me.” Rather, find out what needs to be done, and help fix the problem. This also applies to blame, it’s easy to blame someone else for the problem, but again, your customers don’t care about who made the mistake. They care that you fix it, and it is your job to take responsibility for finding a solution as a representative of your organization.

Make it Your Mission

It’s easy to pass off a complaint to someone else, but a customer doesn’t want to go through the shuffle of being passed from office to office. Make it your mission to help this customer get a resolution. Pick up the phone and find a specific person to help the situation. Ensure they contact the customer, and that a solution is reached.

Facebook Timeline for Brands: What it Means for Higher Ed

As most people know, Facebook Timeline for Brands was released to page admins yesterday. If you’re like me, you’ve been planning and scheming based on the rumors of what Timeline could have possibly looked like. Picking out cover images, thinking about how the changes will effect your content strategy, how will you decide what to pin to the top of your timeline and what to highlight, in addition to keeping all the new terms straight in your head! But now it’s here!

So, how do all these upgrades change the game?

The Look

The first noticeable change is of course the general look of the page. You have more real estate! This is a definite win. With the cover images, you can prominently display the beauty of your campus, or create a graphic that plays directly into a campaign you are running. There are almost endless possibilities. The only limitation, is that your cover image can’t be a majority of text. Facebook doesn’t want you dipping into their advertising revenues. However, as someone who doesn’t have a social media advertising budget because of the type of funding that my office receives, this is a huge improvement.

I would argue that this is even better than having a landing page, although I know many will disagree. Only people who haven’t liked your page automatically see your landing page, but once you have a committed user, they see your wall upon visiting your page. The cover image is always the first thing any one will see, no matter what their like status is.

Messages

When I first saw the messages button on my page, I was ecstatic! Did Facebook read my mind and find one of my biggest wants for a brand page? No, in fact, they didn’t. Profile users can now message page admins, and they can respond back, however, pages can not initiate the conversation. The reasoning being that spam in user’s inboxes would be out of control. I agree with this reason, however, can’t just the good admins who understand spamming is bad have the ability to reach out?

I know, I kind of seem obsessed with this, but I have good reason. On the Texas Tech page, we do not allow profanity (as most admins don’t), and if we remove a comment because of a curse word or two, I message them and ask them to repost without the curse words. That sounds fantastic, and most of the time, it works out fine. But sometimes, people are very angry, and I don’t always want my full name and everything about myself attached to the message I am sending. That is where being able to send messages as the page would be a huge improvement. Alas, it has not been added, so I will continue on.

Highlighting and Pinning Posts

These might be the two things I am the most excited about! Who doesn’t want to give their content more staying power? I don’t know anyone who doesn’t. Some things you post are more evergreen, or are more important than others, that’s just fact. Now page admins have the ability to make those things that are more important than others look more important, and stick around longer. Can’t get much better than that! I think this is even more important when you factor in how often higher ed pages can post and get the engagement they are looking for. (By the way: If you haven’t checked out these two articles by Blue Fuego, How much is too much on Facebook? and 2011 State of Higher Ed Facebook Pages you’re missing out on some good research!)

Resources

Here are also some good resources on Timeline for Brands that might help you get up and running!