Retweet After Me: Week of Oct. 22, 2013

Use Images on Twitter to Get More ReTweets by Dan Zarrella

I collected a dataset of more than 400,000 randomly selected Tweets and the number of times each tweet received a “new school” (native) ReTweet. I then compared 4 of the most popular ways to send images to Twitter: Facebook image links (images hosted on Facebook’s CDN, fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net), Instagram, Twitpic and Twitter’s own, native image uploading service (shown in Tweets as pic.Twitter.com). [Read More]

You Are a Source: How to Reach and Influence Journalists with Social Media by Ian Greenleigh

Facebook ads are one interesting tool in the outreach kit, and especially useful when you have a fresh, informed angle on a hot story the media already cares about. I worked with my publisher on the infographic you see below to promote my just-released book, The Social Media Side Door: How to Bypass the Gatekeepers to Gain Greater Access and Influence. [Read More]

How Duplicate Content Fits Into Your Social Strategy by Elizabeth Harper

We’ve all seen instances of businesses repeating themselves on social networks — reposting a morning message in the evening for a new audience, perhaps. Sometimes this cross-posting can be a social win, helping more viewers see your messages, but other times it takes a nose-dive into spam territory, which is likely to drive your follower counts down. [Read More]

Social Listening: Damned If You Do, Damned If You Don’t by Jae Baer

“Listen” is the dogma of social media. Every social media consultant since the dawn of Friendster has a slide (or 23) about listening in every presentation. It’s the axiom that power the entire social media value proposition for brands. Eavesdropping on customers conversations yields positive outcomes, period. Or does it? [Read More]

The Beginner’s Guide to HootSuite by Marissa Cetin

Juggling multiple social media accounts across several networks can get hectic, especially when there’s a fine line between a manageable number of browser tabs and a terrible guessing game. [Read More]

Retweet After Me: Week of Oct. 8, 2013

How To Convert Social Media Fans Into Foot Traffic by Lauren Fernandez

Your social content across the board should be treated as a type of ad. Witty content with a photo of product? You want it to cause an action. Promotion that you want to have a WOM domino effect? You are indirectly advertising to them. Manipulation through data is key to get people into the stores. [Read More]

AP Style in the Digital Age by BurrellesLuce

Just because modern technology has abbreviated our language with “GTG,” “BRB” and “IDK” (all AP-approved, thx) doesn’t mean that modern professional PR writers should throw vowels to the wind. [Read More]

Snapchat’s next big thing: ‘Stories’ that don’t just disappear by Ellis Hamburger

Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel’s hands are shaking as he points to his iPhone. He’s unmistakably nervous, and not in a sweaty, early-Mark Zuckerberg kind of way. There must be a lot on his mind as the young CEO of a company bounding toward a $1 billion valuation — a company that has changed the course of being a teenager in the year 2013. Spiegel brushes off Snapchat’s latest bragging right: the service sees 350 million snaps sent per day. He seems anxious, as if he’s about to interview for a job or deliver a commencement speech to his graduating class. [Read More]

People more likely to share mobile location information with companies to get discounts, deals and customer service support by Faves & Co.

How concerned are you with sharing your location with businesses from your mobile device? A new study says almost half of respondents are willing to share their location information with companies. They do so in order to get things like relevant offers, timely alerts and to connect with customer service. [Read More]

What Are the Targeting Options on Paid Social Media by TBG

Check out this awesome infographic! [Read More]

Quality Over Quantity Counts in Social Media Channels

social-media-channels

Every time a new social media channel starts to become popular, or sometimes even before, blog posts start popping up everywhere about why you HAVE to be on that new channel immediately or your entire social strategy will end up in the toilet. Those people make me laugh because how do they know what will kill my social strategy? The point is, quality counts over quantity. We’ve all heard it, but it also applies to social media. Here are the questions you should ask yourself before jumping in with a presence on the “next big social media channel.”

Does the New Channel Fit with your Strategy?

Not every channel fits every strategy. There’s no other way to say it than that. If your strategy includes targeting men, then Pinterest is probably not the place for you. Look at your goals, and if you think this new channel will help you accomplish them, then it’s worth a look. If not, then the answer is simple. Don’t jump in!

Do You Already Have a Channel with the Same Features?

Vine, Instagram and YouTube all do varieties of the same thing: video. Be strategic in the channels you pick. If you have diverse enough content to sustain different video content on all three channels, and you have a distinct purpose for being on all three, go for it! But I think for the majority of us, that’s not feasible. Pick one channel in each category and commit to it.

Does Your Content Fit There?

Some content is better discussed in words, other content looks great in pictures, and even others dominate video. Whatever your content lends itself to, make sure your social channels will let it shine. Type of content isn’t the only thing, though, subject of content matters, too. Make sure the audience on the new channel wants to hear the subject you have to talk about.

Do You Have the Manpower to Maintain Another Channel?

Even if all these other answers point to yes, if you don’t have the time and ability to properly maintain another channel, the answer should still be no. Throwing things together, and not giving the audience you have what they deserve is detrimental, rather than helpful. If you can write content that is diverse and interesting, it may be the correct decision to hold off on joining another social media channel.

4 Tools to Organize Social Media Content

Organization is something I believe is very personal. Each and every person has an organization structure that makes sense and works for them. At the same time, I think that we can all learn ways to improve what is working for us, and in order for that to happen, people have to share what they’re doing! So this week I’m going to share how I organize my social media content, and other communications I’m responsible for. I hope you’ll share what works for you, too!

Argyle Social

argyle

I don’t know how many times I’ve talked about Argyle Social, but it’s a lot. I really love the content calendar/scheduling platform, and it makes everything about keeping track of content easier for me. I have to make it work for me a bit, since Argyle currently doesn’t support posting to LinkedIn Company Pages, Tumblr, Instagram or using the targeting features of Facebook, but just being able to save draft posts for those things helps me schedule out the day. I use Argyle to show me my micro-view of social media content.

Google Calendar

google-calendar

While I use my Exchange calendar that is included with my work email address for my personal schedule, I use a Google Calendar to mark different communications or marketing plans that I have committed content to. I know that sounds kind of weird, but as our office is responsible for the entire university’s communications, I work with four PR people who have beats of each college and area on campus. They write communications plans for a variety of events and topics, and I add what social media I think is appropriate to that plan. After that, I have to follow through, so I add those social media pieces to the Google Calendar. It also includes things like when other advertisements and marketing pieces are running, so I can make sure to talk about them on social media. You can see I add a ton of things to it! I use Google Calendar to show more of a macro-view of my social media content.

Basecamp

basecamp

I mentioned our PR people, but our office also has an editor, a video team, a photographer and graphic designers. All of these people are necessary to make our news site run. As a group, they use Basecamp to keep track of stories, videos, news releases, advisories and pitches. I use their calendar to let me know when stories I want to feature on social media are coming out. I typically transfer this content straight into Argyle Social as a draft, to become a placeholder for when the news story is released.

Todoist

todoist

While this isn’t specifically a tool I use for social media, it definitely keeps me organized with everything in my life. Typically I use Todoist to keep track of social media-related things, reminding myself to update cover images, telling my social media interns something, or telling myself to add that piece of content I thought about while at the grocery store. Also, while my main role is social media, I am also responsible for a lot of different types of communications and marketing. Without Todoist, it would be a lot harder to get every thing done! Todoist is the most easy-to-use to do list I’ve come across, and I love that it’s fully featured, but you can use what works for you. I hate it when I’m forced into something that doesn’t work for me, but Todoist doesn’t do that! I also really love the mobile app, and the reminders I get through being a premium member ($3/month). It helps me prioritize everything going on, from my school work for my master’s, things I need to do around the house, and all of my work tasks. You just can’t beat it!

So what do you use to organize your social media content? Anything else others should consider, or do you use one of these tools is a different way?

Retweet After Me: Sept. 17, 2013

Facebook and LinkedIn Figure Out What PR Pros Have Known For Years by Chad Pollitt

LinkedIn’s stock price has doubled this year and Facebook’s grew by 42 percent. Both companies are surging because they’ve outperformed expectations by growing revenue. They’ve also recently added new ways to advertise – sponsored updates for LinkedIn and mobile newsfeed ads for Facebook. While LinkedIn has multiple revenue streams, Facebook’s is primarily driven by paid media buys. Both social media sites rely on selling advertising to drive some portion of their revenue. [Read More]

How to Use Twitter Hashtags in a Crisis by Chris Syme

You’ve seen those tweets—the ones where #every #other #word has a #hashtag. Because a hashtag draws attention to a person, place, or thing, tweets overloaded with hashtags are confusing. According to a recent report from Hubspot, tweets with two hashtags get 21 percent more engagement than those with three or more. Not really a surprising factoid. But, there is more to the science of hashtags than just numbers, especially in a crisis. Here are some quick tips on how to use Twitter hashtags in a crisis. [Read More]

Twitter Expands Lead Generation Cards to All Businesses by Todd Wasserman

After a limited test in May, Twitter on Thursday announced it is opening up its Lead Generation Cards to all businesses. The Cards let businesses register users and their emails for promotions or memberships directly within a tweet. When you click to expand the tweet, you’ll see an option to sign up with your Twitter handle and connected email already filled out.[Read More]

Twitter Co-Founder Evan Williams Lays Out His Plan For The Future Of Media by Gregory Ferenstein

Twitter Co-Founder Evan Williams has an ambitious new plan: to shift our daily reading habits away from consuming incremental news bites and towards engaging with enlightened ideas curated by an intelligent algorithm. Ordinarily, such a goal would seem utopian, were it not for the fact that Williams is among a handful of Internet pioneers who have disrupted the media industry multiple times. [Read More]

The Dos and Don’ts of Pitching Journalists on Social Media by Zoe Fox

Social media is a blessing and a curse when it comes to pitching journalists. While Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Foursquare and Instagram — yes, Foursquare and Instagram pitches happen — present many new opportunities to forge connections, it’s very easy to step onto inappropriate turf. [Read More]

Avoiding Social Media Marketing Mishaps

Too often the headline, “Company makes social media blunder, offends large group of people,” goes by on social media. And these headlines aren’t exclusive to social media, but can happen with any advertising, public relations or marketing tactic. There are a few simple ways to avoid this becoming your reality.

Use Common Sense

att-9-11-post

If your are recognizing a day of remembrance of a tragedy, you can pretty much guarantee slipping a product reference or sale price in to your social media or other content or advertising is probably going to be received poorly. People are passionate about these events, and if they think you are trying to make a profit off of a national tragedy, they will call you on it. If you are going to recognize this day, separate your promotional materials. Have to push a sale or marketing piece, then don’t recognize the day of remembrance, or what ever the tragedy or event might be, at the same time. Make separate posts, and space them out a bit.

Plan Ahead

I know I’m the biggest poster child for planning ahead, but this is even more important in this type of situation. Think out what you are going to say well before hand. One word slightly out of place could be enough to upset your audience. I find myself double checking the meanings of words that I know the meanings of, just to be sure it can’t be taken in a way I didn’t intend.

golf-course-9-11

We all know that tone is lost in written digital communications, so make sure your tone can not be misconstrued. If you take the time to do this all ahead of the posting time, then you can be confident your post won’t land you in hot social media water.

Wear Other’s Shoes

Take some time to research the event or day that you will be making a post for. Do you consider Memorial Day as the first day of summer? You should probably take some time to read up on what Memorial Day is for others. An easy way to get an overall understanding is reading up on the topic on Wikipedia. I find that Wikipedia typically shows a well-rounded view on big topics like these. This especially applies when talking to an international audience.

Now that you know these easy ways to avoid these marketing blunders, go forth and avoid them!

Retweet After Me: Week of Sept. 10, 2013

How Curation Fits into your Marketing Mix Part 2: 8 Tips for Successful Content Curation by Pawan Deshpande

Our last post introduced you to the concept of content curation and included some examples of curation in action. Now that you have a feel for what curation is all about and how it fits into your marketing mix, let’s dive into some tips and tricks for effective and ethical curation. [Read More]

What the Latest Facebook News Feed Changes Mean for Your Business by Kate Rose

Another day, another Facebook tweak! Last week, Facebook announced a number of changes to the way that the Newsfeed works. This time, it won’t look any different; but the coding underlying what each user sees has changed, so the content of the news feed will be a little different. [Read More]

11 practical, use-them-right-now tips that will help you produce better Instagram Videos by Faves + Co

Back in June, we offered a few tips for making Instagram Videos, but we’ve learned so much since then. Telling stories via video in 15 seconds (or less) is truly an art form and presents new challenges and opportunities for content producers. Now that you can upload pre-recorded content to Instagram, there’s unlimited potential to how you can create and share your world. [Read More]

The One Reason Every Blogger Should Use Google+ by Steve Cooper

Once again this week I was asked by a colleague why they should care about Google GOOG +0.02%+. This is a person who regularly publishes content, already has a full plate and wanted to be convinced why she should take up another social network. A scenario that’s all too familiar with many people I come in contact with. To expedite the conversation, I have one simple response that will make setting up your Google+ page worth your time: Google Authorship. [Read More]

Why Twitter’s New Conversations View is a Big Deal and Why it Matters for its IPO by Om Malik

Twitter wants to go public and in order to do so, it needs to grow really fast – both in terms of revenues and users. And in order to do so, it needs to cut ties with the past and look at the normals. [Read More]

What a Whopper: Burger King Twitter Falls to Hacking

As many of you have noticed, the King has fallen to a hacking. This is a situation that could happen to anyone, especially if your password is an easy one to guess. Tweets from the hacked account ranged from everything from promoting rival McDonalds, to talking about drug use and other harmful topics. Some people have mentioned that Burger King isn’t normally getting this kind of publicity, but is it worth it?

burger king twitter hacking
Burger King’s Twitter Account Mid-hacking

The Situation

This is one of those times when people start asking, “Is all publicity good publicity?” And the answer is no. Seeing tweets that could offend customers coming from a brand is never going to go over well with your entire audience. While this may cause a surge in followers and engagement for today and maybe this week, it won’t remain long term, and it isn’t from loyal customers. The new followers are people who wanted to watch the train wreck, and the engagement is the residual smoke. Also, you might think that Burger King might not get hit too hard, since they were innocent in this case, which might be true. But a hacking situation still does not give your team credibility, or make them look knowledgeable.

Avoiding and Protecting

So now that we all know we’d like to avoid this situation, how do we go about protecting our social accounts, whether it belongs to a brand, or a individual. Not all of these solutions apply directly to the Burger King situation, but they are good rules of thumb.

  • Change your password every few months, and especially after a staff member leaves
  • Avoid writing down passwords, for obvious reasons
  • Don’t use words in your passwords, instead use a series of letters that only means something to you. For example: make a sentence in which the first letters could be used as the password. My dog is black would be Mdib is a password.
  • Use both numbers and letters in your passwords
  • Report hacked accounts immediately
  • Change passwords on all other accounts after one has been compromised

Aftermath

I’d guess there is some apologizing in Burger King’s future, simply for the things the hackers said on their account. The account has since been suspended, so at least no more damage is being done. I’m sure there will be a conversation about Twitter security within their communications team, too. I think we’ll know more as we learn how their account was hacked.

I feel for this social media team, and know that they will be dealing with cleaning up a huge mess. I think the social media specialist at Wendy’s put it best:

 

Social Media Measurement: Taking the First Baby Steps

If you listen to what’s being said out there about measuring social media, you’re bound to hear everything from, “You must measure,” to, “It’s impossible to measure.” Personally, I find myself in between these two methodologies, thinking, “Measuring is important, but doesn’t replace intuition and gut feelings.” So where do you start measuring your social media? Here are a few key metrics to pay attention to, and some great tools for measuring your success.

Meaningful Measurements

facebook insights
Facebook Insights Graph

Facebook

If you’ve ever taken a look at the Facebook Insights for your brand page, you know there are quite a few numbers available, especially if you export the data. But there is a way to get a quick sense of how your Facebook posts are doing, by looking at the number of engaged users. This is a key metric that I look at, and have in my goals. I also like to take a look at the virality of those posts. This is the percentage of people who have created what Facebook calls stories out of the number of people who saw the post. This is a good way to see how posts have spread.

twitter

Twitter

Twitter doesn’t have any built-in analytics, but there are other opportunities to look at how your content is fairing out in the world. Retweets and favorites seem like an obvious way to measure, but this, again, measures engagement, which is a key metric in social media. Recording these numbers, along with replies, is a great way to start to get a grasp on measuring.

Tools to Measure

hootsuite ow.ly click summary
Hootsuite Ow.ly Click Summary

HootSuite

HootSuite has some great stats, even in the free version. HootSuite uses the Ow.ly link shortener, which opens up some possibilities of measuring what happens with your tweeted content. The Ow.ly Click Summary will break down clicks by region, rank the most popular tweets, and the top referrers.

 

 

 

Social Google Analytics
Google Analytics – Measuring Social Referrals

Google Analytics

I know what you’re saying, Google Analytics measures web traffic not social traffic! And this is partially true. But Google Analytics also includes a social section in which you can measure social clicks to your website. I use this feature all the time, since part of my social strategy is pushing traffic to our university’s news site. I can see exactly how much traffic came from social sources. Now, this doesn’t mean that the university’s social presences can claim all that traffic, but it’s still informative, especially if you combine it with one of the other measuring tools I’ve discussed.

Argyle Social Measurement
Argyle Social Measurement

Argyle Social

I’ve fallen in social media love, or at least that’s what I told my boss the minute after I finished watching a demo of Argyle Social. For someone who wants the highest level of organization possible when it comes to social media (which can be hard), this is the tool to make it happen. But that’s for a different blog post. One of the best parts about Argyle Social is the analytics it has built in. You can organize your content into campaigns, and also set goals for conversions. I especially love being able to see all of my stats in one place. Argyle Social is a paid solution, but I found it to be reasonably priced for my needs.

Have you started measuring your social media efforts? What are you using to measure?

Retweet After Me: Week of Jan. 9, 2013

Ok, here we go again! Let’s give this whole blogging thing another try. This time I’m actually going to keep up with it.

Jetpack 2.1 for WordPress.org by Cheri Lucas

After we announced media changes on WordPress.com, some of you asked when these new WordPress.com features would be available for self-hosted WordPress sites. Well, wait no more! The latest features brought to WordPress.com — such as tiled galleries and slideshows — are now available for WordPress.org users with self-hosted sites through the Jetpack 2.1 release. You can now show off your images in gorgeous photo mosaics and slideshows that integrate seamlessly with the Carousel module. [ Read More ]

11-point Checklist for a Healthy Social Media Strategy by Susan Young

It’s time to zero in on social media strategy and determine if you’re having an identity crisis. Is your digital strategy healthy, or lingering on life support? [ Read More ]

Update Overload Remains Brands’ Biggest Social Danger by eMarketer

As many brands have spent the past several years engaging with customers and prospects on social networking sites, marketers have a good idea of what gets web users to connect. Typically, social networkers say they make “friends” with or follow a brand’s posts to find out about special offers and deals, and current research is consistent with that reasoning. [ Read More ]

Your Social Media Marketing Checklist for 2013 by Jasmine Sandler

As we enter a hopeful new year, we thought it would be helpful to deliver some key items for your corporate social media strategy checklist for 2013. And, as we also enter a new year of Google changes to the ever-important search algorithm, we include a review of SEO from a social standpoint. [ Read More ]

The Anatomy of a Social Media Command Center by Nancy Messieh

In the recent months, many major brands have developed what they are calling “Social Media Command Centers.” These centers are state-of-the-art listening hubs that allow brands to monitor their presence on major social platforms and be ultra-responsive to conversations happening about their company. The following infographic, looks at three of the most noteworthy examples of social media command centers and the tools that power them. [ Read More ]