Retweet After Me: Week of Jan. 9, 2013

Ok, here we go again! Let’s give this whole blogging thing another try. This time I’m actually going to keep up with it.

Jetpack 2.1 for WordPress.org by Cheri Lucas

After we announced media changes on WordPress.com, some of you asked when these new WordPress.com features would be available for self-hosted WordPress sites. Well, wait no more! The latest features brought to WordPress.com — such as tiled galleries and slideshows — are now available for WordPress.org users with self-hosted sites through the Jetpack 2.1 release. You can now show off your images in gorgeous photo mosaics and slideshows that integrate seamlessly with the Carousel module. [ Read More ]

11-point Checklist for a Healthy Social Media Strategy by Susan Young

It’s time to zero in on social media strategy and determine if you’re having an identity crisis. Is your digital strategy healthy, or lingering on life support? [ Read More ]

Update Overload Remains Brands’ Biggest Social Danger by eMarketer

As many brands have spent the past several years engaging with customers and prospects on social networking sites, marketers have a good idea of what gets web users to connect. Typically, social networkers say they make “friends” with or follow a brand’s posts to find out about special offers and deals, and current research is consistent with that reasoning. [ Read More ]

Your Social Media Marketing Checklist for 2013 by Jasmine Sandler

As we enter a hopeful new year, we thought it would be helpful to deliver some key items for your corporate social media strategy checklist for 2013. And, as we also enter a new year of Google changes to the ever-important search algorithm, we include a review of SEO from a social standpoint. [ Read More ]

The Anatomy of a Social Media Command Center by Nancy Messieh

In the recent months, many major brands have developed what they are calling “Social Media Command Centers.” These centers are state-of-the-art listening hubs that allow brands to monitor their presence on major social platforms and be ultra-responsive to conversations happening about their company. The following infographic, looks at three of the most noteworthy examples of social media command centers and the tools that power them. [ Read More ]

Retweet After Me: Week of April 3, 2012

Here are my favorite social media reads this week!

Harley-Davidson Shatters Stereotypes on Twitter by Matt Wilson

Imagine the typical Harley-Davidson owner. Look a lot like a character from “Easy Rider”? Or maybe “Mad Max”? Well, wipe that image from your mind, because Harley Motor Co. is looking to prove that its customer base doesn’t fit any set profile. In a YouTube video released in February, the company encouraged followers to use the Twitter hashtag #StereotypicalHarley with the idea that there’s no stereotype at all. [ Read More ]

[HOW TO] 5 Ways To Create Social Landing Pages That Convert by Oil Gardner

Social landing pages are not the same as regular old landing pages. The idea of sharing content is not a “new” word-of-mouth-marketing (WOMM) concept. But the mechanisms now available to facilitate it are. In this post you’ll learn how to contemporize your landing pages with the latest social media techniques and widgets, and why it’s beneficial to do so. [ Read More ]

Facebook Photos: Now High Resolution, Four Times Larger by Alissa Skelton

Facebook has frequently changed the way it displays photos. Now Facebook is rolling out its greatest photo update yet. Facebook will display photos in high-resolution and allow full-screen viewing of images. The pictures will be crisper, higher quality and can be up to four times larger than before, Facebook announced. [ Read More ]

Twitter Updates TweetDeck, Allows Users to Edit and Retweet by Christina Warren

Still struggling in the wake of its acquisition by Twitter, TweetDeck has just issued an update to its desktop, Chrome and web apps that adds support for better list management, inline media support and improved retweeting support. [ Read More ]

Facebook Explains Its New Real-Time Insights by Matthew Creamer

In a matter of days, Facebook will begin rolling out a real-time version of Page Insights, the analytics tool that allows brands to keep tabs on their Facebook presence. Recently, Insights has been much maligned for reporting delays, but that should all be quieted with instantaneous reporting on page and post performance that will give brands a much improved level of control. [ Read More ]

Audience and Tone: Two Important Steps Not to Skip

Social media is all the rage, and for good reason, but there are a few things that you should remember in your strategy that can be easily forgotten. Social media is just another communications channel, and should be treated as such.

Audience

In every post, tweet, message, press release, whatever piece of communication it is, you should always think about who your audience is. I know, you’re saying this is communications 101, but it can be easy to forget to actively think about this important step. And when I say every tweet, I honestly mean it. It might seem a little overkill, but what is the point of sending out messages if they aren’t going to reach their targets in a way that makes sense to them?

Tips to Achieve

  • Make a note to ask yourself who your intended audience is. For instance, keep a content plan for your social media content? Make a column or a place to write down who your target is. Then you won’t forget to consider what things will resonate best.
  • Know your audiences in general. Writing posts and tweets to communicate with these audiences is easier if you pay attention to what those audiences engage with. Brands can find themselves with many different audiences, for instance, for universities you can have students, prospective students, alumni, faculty, staff and even parents. Obviously you can’t reach all audiences with each post, but if you have 2 out of 6 audiences in mind with one post and know they will react, then you can focus on the others with other posts. This is where knowing what your audiences enjoy and expect comes in handy.

Tone

Another thing I’ve seen passed over recently is presenting an appropriate tone for your brand. A surf shop can do the whole “What’s up, dude,” vibe, but you probably wouldn’t like to hear a similar tone from your bank. Without the correct tone, your message isn’t achieving your intended message.

Tips to Achieve

  • Your tone should align with your brand’s mission, vision and goals. If it doesn’t, then your message is not having the impact and impression it should. At Texas Tech, we are a national research university, and while we have some leeway with messaging, I really focus on making sure our tone represents this fact.
  • Your tone should assure your audience, it shouldn’t sound over the top, unless your brand is known for these things. I suggest writing down words that come to mind when you think about your brand, this will help you decide what an appropriate tone is, or even better, also ask someone who doesn’t work in communications for the brand, you’ll get an honest answer. Then compare the two lists of words and phrases.

Retweet After Me: Week of March 13, 2012

Welcome to my new weekly series, Retweet After Me! Once a week, I’ll post a few articles that I’ve read over the last week and think need to be passed on. So enjoy some reads, and Retweet After Me!

9 Social Media Hacks I Use Every Day by Jay Baer

Social media isn’t inexpensive, it’s just different expensive. To do it well requires a tremendous time commitment, and regardless of what your life and lifestyle entails, the time you spend on social comes with an opportunity cost price tag. Thus, one of the characteristics that sets adept practitioners of social media apart from less successful adherents is wise use of time. [ Read More ]

12 Dos and Don’ts for PR Interns by Lorra M. Brown

When the semester began in January, I was busy sending credit verification letters to internship sites for my students. It is timely to include a short list of tips for student interns. Here are some dos and don’ts for interns… [ Read More ]

Why Higher Ed Sucks At Content Strategy by Michael Fienen

Let’s face it, higher ed has problems. They have a lot of problems. Whether it’s bad coding, poor graphic design, or a lack of upkeep, someone is always talking about something that’s not working and getting plenty of sympathy from the rest of the web development community. Article after article, conference after conference we talk about all the different things we have trouble with and try to understand why it doesn’t work and what to do about it. One area that’s been getting more and more focus, in part thanks to folks like Meet Content, is content strategy (regardless of whether or not you think it’s a “Real Thing.” I’m looking at you, Karlyn). With the start of a new year, many of us are taking some time to revisit our policies and practices, and get ready for a better 2012. But there’s one big problem when it comes to content strategy for us… [ Read More ]

5 Reasons Measuring Social Media Isn’t Always a Good Idea by Matt Ridings

Social media measurement is a seemingly simple issue with a complex point. Or perhaps a “nuanced” point is more accurate. I obviously believe in data; it’s a big part of what I’ve done over my career. [ Read More ]

Managing Negative Feedback: Social Media Marketing Campaigns by Angelita Williams

Social media marketing is becoming a most popular and useful marketing option for business. It is also readily apparent that social media is here to stay, and that is will prove to be ever more effective for worldwide users/proponents around the world. [ Read More ]

Have an interesting article that I should take a look at? Leave me a comment!

Customer Service Applies to Social Media Too

As some of you might know, I am getting ready to tie the knot in May. Thanks to this, I have been dealing with many different companies and the services and products they provide. Over the last few weeks, I have found myself in a tough position due to some mistakes by the company who is providing my bridesmaid dresses. If you know me personally, or follow me on Twitter, you may know who this company is, but since the mistakes have since been corrected, I am not going to give them anymore hell by mentioning them here. However, this doesn’t mean that there aren’t some social media customer service lessons to be learned, especially for higher education!

I feel like some companies forget that social media is just another channel for customer service, and a very important one at that. There are a lots of followers with all eyes on the conversation. Here are some tips to help make the conversation go as smoothly as possible!

Listen

Something I learned back when I was a waitress is to always listen to the entire problem being told to you. Many times, you think that you know what the problem will be, when in reality, the problem is something completely different. Make sure you solve the problems being voiced to you over social media by reading the entire problem, and even reaching out for more information if necessary.

Sorry Goes a Long Way

Apologize for the situation, no matter how large or small. You would be surprised how far the simple words, “I’m sorry,” go. It shows you understand their problem, and you are invested in assisting them find a solution.

No One Cares About the Processes

In every organization, there are processes to handle problems, there has to be. However, your customers do not care what your processes are. All they want is for you to listen to their problem and to fix it. Your answer to their problem should never be, “The ‘blank’ department is responsible for that, not me.” Rather, find out what needs to be done, and help fix the problem. This also applies to blame, it’s easy to blame someone else for the problem, but again, your customers don’t care about who made the mistake. They care that you fix it, and it is your job to take responsibility for finding a solution as a representative of your organization.

Make it Your Mission

It’s easy to pass off a complaint to someone else, but a customer doesn’t want to go through the shuffle of being passed from office to office. Make it your mission to help this customer get a resolution. Pick up the phone and find a specific person to help the situation. Ensure they contact the customer, and that a solution is reached.